Success came as a shock to Iris Law

Published October 3, 2017

London has been hit with one of its hottest summer days in decades, yet Iris Law remains cool and relaxed in her hotel room just a few miles from her family home in Primrose Hill. The 16-year-old is riding high from having just finished taking the British equivalent of the SATs. “I have all this free time now!” she says. “I even managed to go see my dad in a play in Amsterdam and bought loads of seven-dollar dresses.”

While Law sounds like your average teenager, the father in question is Jude Law, her mother is the actress Sadie Frost, and her extracurricular activities include fronting major fashion campaigns (she is the face of Burberry Beauty this season). “It came as a shock rather than anything,” says Law of her swift modeling ascent, which began a few years ago when the stylist Violetta Kassapi approached her to appear in a goth-inflected, slumber-party-set shoot for Illustrated People pajamas. “Usually I would have said no,” she says, “but it was such a cool idea that I agreed, and then the next thing I knew it was all over Snapchat.” Of course, it helps that Law has her godmother, supermodel Kate Moss, to offer up seasoned career advice: “She said if you put the back of your tongue to the roof of your mouth it makes your jawline look better.”

Amid an ever-growing list of famous progeny forging their own paths in the spotlight, there’s an impressive, down-to-earth wisdom in Law that suggests she’s in it for the long haul. In college, she plans to specialize in fine art and photography, and has recently taken to drawing dresses. “I love to match something girly with something a bit more tomboyish,” she says, while admitting that she frequently raids the closets of both her parents. “I just want to do something creative that’s tangible, that is a thing I know I produced myself—whether that’s a collection or a series of paintings or a gallery show.” For now, though, the most pressing things on her agenda are afternoon tea followed by a Frank Ocean show. “And then,” she says, “the world.”